Researchers are tracking malaria with cell phones, a bus equiped with laptops, solar panels and a teacher is taking school to the students, and more… This is our latest roundup of tweets from the international community.

For up-to-the-minute updates from our Twitter, please follow us at @Engineer4Change.

The UK-based non-profit Advance Aid is changing the way we give aid to developing countries after they suffer natural disasters. GOOD reports. Rather than the influx of aid by cargo planes ladden with materials, Advance Aid is stockpiling locally produced emergency supplies, such as buckets, blankets and mosquito nets. The goal is to keep more aid money in the local economies where disasters happen.

 

The Arab Science and Technology Foundation is funding start-up research companies in Arab Spring countries. The organization plans to push ideas along from the laboratory to the market, with an emphasis on things that can improve the quality of life. The Science and Development Network reports.

 

SELCO, a solar company based in India, designed a solar-powered school room on a bus. The mobile school room comes with a trained teacher, has room for 50 students and powers 10 laptops, fans and lights with 400 watts of solar modules.

 

The UN’s office for disaster risk reduction (UNISDR) tweeted a link to an article on reducing earthquake damage in Central Asian cities. The recommendations are heightened awareness, retrofitting buidings and strengthening building codes and zoning regulations, among others.

 

Ned Breslin tweeted a link to an article in Ars Technica that explains a new attempt to harness the cell phone proliferation in Africa. This time, it’s to track malaria in Kenya.

 

 

John Akudago highlighted his work at the Pacific Institute in our webinar on choosing the best water technologies for rural communities. See our upcoming webinar here, and visit our YouTube channel for our webinar archive. http://engineeringforchange-webinars.org/ http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFC2D8180DF11AAAA