Do-it-yourself glaciers, unsuitable algae biofules, low-tech mosquito deterrents and colorful sanitation talk rank among the memorable tweets in engineering for global development recently. For up-to-the-minute updates from E4C on Twitter, please follow us at @Engineer4Change.

The Economist paints a bleak picture of on-the-grid electrification in rural India, then the article brightens with examples of the success of extremely small-scale solar projects.

So algae biofuels might not be a solution…

Bicycles will always have a warm place in the hearts of E4C staff. They’re efficient and they’re like theSwiss Army Knives of machines: so many uses.

Disaster prevention tools are almost always an appropriate technology…

This colorful call to arms against the sanitation crisis in developing countries comes over the Internet from John Kluge, founder of Toilet Hackers, who moderated our latest E4C Webinar. He’s referring to Jack Sim, founder of the World Toilet Organization, who led the webinar. We live-tweet webinars under the hashtag #E4CWebinars.

Another irrestibly quotable moment from Jack Sim’s webinar.

DIY glaciers are an interesting invention for agriculture in cold climates. As glaciers retreet under the heat of climate change, engineers in India push back.

Low tech is often the best tech. Fans and nets are reliable. Still waiting for the mosquito lasers we’ve been promised, though.

Anil Gupta, who founded the HoneyBee Network, tells CNN about his search for low-tech solutions to Indian problems.